FTD Automation Pvt. Ltd.
OrCAD
OrCAD PSpice SLPS option

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Data Sheet

Electro-mechanical system simulation with PSpice-accuracy for actual electronics

Designers utilize PSpice ® simulation solutions for accurate analog and mixed-signal simulations supported by a wide range of board level models. Simulink ® is a platform for multi-domain simulation and model-based design of dynamic systems. Together, designers now have the ability to perform system level simulations that include realistic electrical models of actual components. Design and integration problems can now be found much earlier in the design process. Simulink has a strong SLD-level design capability and a large user base; PSpice is the industry standard for analog circuit simulation tools. Putting these two powerful tools together gives you the capability to model your circuits more realistically, solve your problems sooner and with less cost.

Product Highlights:

  • Simulate electrical, mechanical, and system-level systems
  • Simulate with ideal models for faster simulation during proof of concept
  • Simulate with actual electrical designs using PSpice component models
  • Electrical simulations with PSpice models exhibit nonlinearities, delay, and other real-world effects
  • Large library of electrical parts for PSpice and mechanical models and predefined blocks for Simulink
  • Full access to PSpice environment for in-depth electrical design and debugging
  • Full access to MATLAB for analyzing and visualizing data, developing graphical user interfaces, and creating model data and parameters

System and Circuit Level Co-Simulation

The Simulink-PSpice (SLPS) Integration combines two industry-leading simulation tools into a co-simulation environment. Electromechanical/hydraulic systems such as control blocks, sensors, power converters, and body-electronics are designed using ideal mathematical models in Simulink. This forms an executable system-level specification for the design of the actual electronics. PSpice is then used to design the circuit based on this specification, providing simulation with more realistic models that exhibit nonlinearities, delay, and other real-life effects. Co-simulation then allows system-level interfaces to be tested with actual electrical designs without the need to prototype the complete system. As a result, design problems are found much earlier, saving crucial time and money often spent in debugging trail boards within system prototypes..